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Gap Vegetation Codes

 CodeDescription
 EDIT TUNDRARocky Mountain Alpine Tundra. Alpine vegetation of mountains dominated by species from the Rocky Mountain biogeographic province.
 EDIT TUNDRAROCKY MOUNTAIN ALPINE TUNDRA [Mapped as 1111 Graminoid Tundra & 1112 Forb Tundra by GAP project in GIS coverage] Alpine vegetation of mountains dominated by species from the Rocky Mountain biogeographic province. Mapped Distribution: the highest elevations of the Sangre de Cristo and Sacramento Mountains. Elevation: greater than 3,500 m (11,500 ft.). Composition: This unit is a complex of the Rocky Mountain Alpine Graminoid Tundra and Forb Tundra Cover Type Groups. Inclusions: Rocky Mountain Subalpine and Montane Grasslands and Rock Outcrop of mountain tops. Ecotones: occur at lower elevations with Rocky Mountain Subalpine Forest and Rocky Mountain Upper Montane Woodlands. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ALPINE GRAMINOID TUNDRA [Mapped as 1111 down to 16 ha. by GAP in GIS]. Composition: Tundra vegetation dominated by grass-like species. Major cover types are Rock Sedge (Carex rupestris) and Alpine Sedge (Kobresia myosuroides). Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Alpine Tundra Regional Biome described above. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ALPINE FORB TUNDRA [Mapped as 1112 down to 16 ha. by GAP in GIS]. Composition: Tundra vegetation dominated by forb species. Major cover types are Alpine avens (Geum rossii), Sierra Blanca Cinquefoil (Potentilla Sierrae-blancae) and Nailwort (Paronychia pulvinata). Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Alpine Tundra Regional Biome described above.
 EDIT FORESTVegetation characterized by trees over 10 meters (33 feet) tall, usually with interlocking canopies exceeding 60% cover (closed forests). This class may include some more open canopied, yet tall statured forest types (open forests of 25-60% cover), but excludes tree cover types that are generally low statured (pygmy conifers such as pinyon pine and juniper). COLD TEMPERATE FOREST: Forests restricted to cold temperate climates with cold to very cold winters and generally cool to mildly warm summers. Includes forests commonly referred to as boreal, subalpine, or montane. ROCKY MOUNTAIN SUBALPINE FOREST: High elevation forests associated with the Rocky Mountain biogeographic province. They are dominated by very cold tolerant, needle-leaved conifer and broadleaf species.
 EDIT SPRUCE-FIRSUBALPINE CONIFER FOREST 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Composition: Closed canopied forests dominated by evergreen needle-leaved, conical crowned conifers. The major cover types are Engelmann Spruce (Picea engelmanni) and Subalpine Fir (Abies lasiocarpa). Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and white fir (Abies concolor) can be significant successional components in the stands. Undergrowth can range from being exceedingly sparse and low diversity (mostly moss), to luxuriant and rich in species. Common characteristic species include myrtle huckleberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus), foeny sedge (Carex foenea), forest fleabane (Erigeron eximius), Jacob's ladder (Polemonium pulcherrimum), osha (Ligusticum porteri), and twinflower (Linnaea borealis) Mapped Distribution: most of the major mountain ranges of the state (Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, Sacramento, Mogollon, Sandia, and San Mateo, etc.). Elevations: 2,900 to 3,600 m (9,500 to 12,000 ft.). Inclusions and ecotones: Rocky Mountain Upper Montane Forests and Open Conifer Woodlands, particularly on lower elevation steep slopes. A narrow ecotone may also occur at higher elevations with Rocky Mountain Alpine Tundra.
 EDIT ASPENSUBALPINE BROADLEAF FOREST 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Closed canopied forests dominated by cold deciduous, broadleaf trees. The major cover type is Aspen (Populus tremuloides). Undergrowth species are similar to those found in Subalpine Conifer Forests. The aspen dominated forests are usually long term successional communities to Subalpine Conifer Forest following disturbances such as fire. Mapped Distribution: most of the major mountain ranges of the state (Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, Sacramento, Mogollon, Sandia, and San Mateo, etc.). Elevations: 2,750 to 3,600 m (9,000 to 12,000 ft.). Inclusions and ecotones: At lower elevations- Rocky Mountain Montane Deciduous Scrub (in particular Gambel Oak Cover Type (Quercus gambelii) on slopes and ridges), and Rocky Mountain Montane Riparian in valley bottoms.
 EDIT DOUGLAS/WHITE FIR mixed coniferROCKY MOUNTAIN UPPER MONTANE CONIFER FOREST [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Forests dominated by conical crowned conifers and which generally form closed canopies (occasional open canopies do occur). The major Cover Types are Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), White Fir (Abies concolor), and Blue Spruce (Picea pungens). Undergrowth is variable ranging from sparse and moss dominated, to shrubby and forb rich, and luxuriant in cover. Common species are Rocky Mountain maple (Acer glabrum), snowberry (Symphoricarpos oreophila), mountain spray (Holodiscus dumosus), Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii), strawberry (Fragaria americana), Canada violet (Viola canadensis), pale geranium (Geranium richardsonis), elk sedge (Carex geyeri), and fringed brome (Bromus ciliatus). Mapped Distribution: most of the major mountain ranges of the state. Elevations: 2,400 to 3,000 m (8,000-10,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Rocky Mountain Subalpine Conifer Forest can occur in higher, colder areas. At lower elevations, inclusions of, and a relatively broad ecotone can occur to Rocky Mountain Lower Montane Forest dominated by Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa).
 EDIT PONDEROSA PINE with OAK UNDERSTORY 
 EDIT CHIHUAHUA/APACHE PINEMADREAN LOWER MONTANE CONIFER FOREST 2 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Forests dominated by evergreen, rounded-crowned conifers which commonly form moderately open to very open canopies. The major cover type of this group is Chihuahua Pine (Pinus leiophylla). Minor cover types are Arizona Pine (Pinus arizonica) and Apache Pine (Pinus engelmanni). Undergrowth is diverse and variable and commonly dominated by evergreen oaks (Quercus hypoleucoides, Q. arizonica, Q. emoryi, Q. toumeyi and Q. grisea) and warm season grasses (Muhlenbergia longiligula & M. emersleyi). Mapped Distribution: scattered among isolated mountain ranges in the southwest corner of the state (Animas and Peloncillo Mountains, etc.), and along the southern flank of the Gila region (Big Lue Mts.). Elevations: 1,675 to 2,500 m (5,500 to 8,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Rocky Mountain Montane Forest can occur as an inclusion or a narrow ecotone at higher elevations. At lower elevations, Madrean Closed Conifer and Oak Woodlands are possible inclusions. Other inclusions are areas that have been recently burned which support Broadleaf Evergreen Interior Chaparral.
 EDIT WOODLANDS 
 EDIT URBAN: VEGETATEDURBAN VEGETATED. [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Areas classified as vegetative cover within the urban boundary. Most agriculture and riparian vegetation retained their original classification.
 EDIT AQUATICWATER. Areas containing open water.
 EDIT AQUATIC: BASIN/PLAYABASIN/PLAYA. 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Drainage basins, playas, stock tanks. Small features may not be identified. Features lacking water or with very shallow water may be identified as barren soil. Features with substantial vegetation may be identified as wetland or lowland/swale grassland vegetation.
 EDIT GRASSGRASSLAND: Vegetation dominated by herbaceous graminoid species. Shrubs comprise less than 25% canopy cover. All grass Cover Type Groups throughout much of the state are frequently grazed much shorter than the structural descriptions given here. MESOPHYTIC GRASSLAND: Grasslands dominated by cold tolerant and moderately drought intolerant species.
 EDIT PONDEROSA PINEROCKY MOUNTAIN LOWER MONTANE CONIFER FOREST [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Forests dominated by rounded crown conifers which form open to closed canopies. This series group in New Mexico is represented by the Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) Cover Type, other tall conifers are usually accidental. Low statured conifers such as pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) and junipers (Juniperus monosperma, J. scopulorum, and J. osteosperma), and broadleaf trees such as Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) can occur in the sub- canopy. Undergrowth is highly variable depending on moisture conditions and degree of canopy closure. Common shrubs include big sage (Artemisia tridentata), snowberry (Symphoricarpos oreophila), wavyleaf oak (Quercus undulata), gambel oak (Q.gambelii), and woodrose (Rosa woodsii). Grasses and forbs include Ross sedge (Carex rossii), mutton bluegrass (Poa fendleriana), junegrass (Koeleria pyramidata), paintbrush (Castilleja rotundifolia), purple geranium (Geranium caespitosum) and meadowrue (Thalictrum fendleri). Under more open canopies, undergrowth tends to be more grassy and dominated by such species as screwleaf muhly (Muhlenbergia virescens), mountain muhly (M. montana), and Arizona fescue (Festuca arizonica). Mapped Distribution: most mountain ranges and at the higher elevations of the northwest plateau region of the state. Elevations: 2,000 to 2,750 m (6,500-9,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Rocky Mountain Upper Montane Forest and Woodlands at higher elevations, and Rocky Mountain Closed Conifer Woodland and Southwest Arroyo Riparian at lower elevations. In the southwestern corner of the state, the ecotone may be to Madrean Montane Forests and Madrean Closed Conifer Woodland.
 EDIT BRISTLECONE/LIMBER PINEUPPER MONTANE OPEN CONIFER WOODLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crowned conifers which form open to very open canopies (25-60% cover). The major cover types are Bristlecone Pine (Pinus aristata) and Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis). Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) can occur as canopy co-dominants. Undergrowth is commonly grassy and forb rich. Characteristic species are Thurber fescue (Festuca thurberi), Arizona fescue (F. arizonica), Parry goldenweed (Oreochrysum parryi), and alpine clover (Trifolium dasyphyllum). In some communities, shrubs such as mountain currant (Ribes montigenum) or kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) are well represented. Mapped Distribution: relatively uncommon and are only mapped at the highest elevations of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Elevations: 2,600 m to over 3,200 m (8,500-10,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At high elevations, inclusions and ecotones are to Subalpine Conifer Forest and Rocky Mountain Alpine Tundra. At lower elevations the ecotone is to Rocky Mountain Upper Montane Conifer Forest.
 EDIT PINYON/JUNIPER closedROCKY MOUNTAIN/GREAT BASIN CLOSED CONIFER WOODLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, low statured conifers that form moderately closed to moderately open canopies (>60% canopy cover). The major cover type is Pinyon Pine (Pinus edulis). Junipers (Juniperus monosperma, J. osteosperma, J. scopulorum and J. deppeana) are common canopy associates. The undergrowth is variable with elements not only from the Rocky Mountains, but also the Great Basin biogeographic province. Some communities are dominated by shrubby oaks (Quercus gambelii, Q. undulata, Q. grisea, & Q. turbinella), or other shrubs such mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus montanus) and big sage (Artemisia tridentata). Other communities are distinctly grassy and, at higher elevations, are commonly dominated by cool season grasses such as western needlegrass (Stipa columbiana), Scribner needlegrass (Stipa scribnerii), Arizona fescue (Festuca arizonica) and mutton bluegrass (Poa fendleriana). At lower elevations warm season grasses can predominate such as blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) or sand bluestem (Andropogon hallii). Common forbs are wholeleaf paintbrush (Castilleja integra), skyrocket (Ipomopsis aggregata), trailing fleabane (Erigeron flagellaris) and Colorado four o'clock (Mirabilis multiflora). Mapped Distribution: extensively mapped in the foothills of most of the mountain ranges of the state except the far southwest corner. They also occur on high plateaus and mesas, and extend out into the Plains on the eastern side of the state. Elevations: 2,000 m 2,500 m (6,500-8,000 ft), with some communities extending down to 1,500 m (5,000 ft) in the north, and up to 2,700 m (9,000 ft) in the south. Inclusions and ecotones: At higher elevations there are inclusions of, and narrow ecotones to Rocky Mountain Lower Montane Conifer Forest. At lower elevations there is Southwest Arroyo Riparian and a broad ecotone to Rocky Mountain Open Conifer Woodland. There can also be inclusions of Rocky Mountain Montane Scrub, particularly in areas which have been burned.
 EDIT REDBERRY JUNIPER openMADREAN OPEN CONIFER WOODLAND Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, low statured conifers that form moderately open to very open canopies (25% to 50% canopy cover). This group is represented by the relatively minor Redberry Juniper (Juniperus erythrocarpa) Cover Type. Undergrowth is shrubby and commonly dominated by evergreen oaks (Quercus turbinella & Q. hypoleucoides). Mapped Distribution: These woodlands are uncommon and are mapped as inclusions within Madrean Closed Conifer Woodland, Broadleaf Evergreen Woodland, and Rocky Mountain Open Conifer Woodland. It may contain inclusions as per 3212.
 EDIT SILVERLEAF/NETLEAF OAK closedMADREAN CLOSED OAK WOODLAND Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, broadleaf evergreen oaks that form moderately closed to open canopies (50% to 80% canopy cover). The major cover types are Silverleaf Oak (Q. hypoleucoides) and Netleaf Oak (Q. rugosa). Undergrowth is variable. Common shrubs are Wright silktassel (Garrya wrightii) and Wright mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus breviflorus). Common grasses and forbs are longtongue muhly (Muhlenbergia longiligula), Orcutts threeawn (Aristida orcuttiana), Texas bluestem (Schizachyrium cirratum) and false pennyroyal (Hedeoma hyssopifolia) Mapped Distribution: These woodlands are uncommon and are mapped as inclusions within Madrean Open Oak Woodland and Closed Conifer Woodland.
 EDIT BARREN: MINES & QUARRIESMINE/QUARRIES [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Areas identified through known geographic location and human-made pattern. Smaller features may be classified as barren or rock outcrop.
 EDIT AZ UPLAND SONORAN DESERTSCRUB (AZ) 
 EDIT AGRICULTURAL: DRYLANDDRYLAND AGRICULTURE [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. May contain inclusions of weedy fields classified as grass or shrublands, or plowed fields classified as barren.
 EDIT MARSH rush/bulrush/sedge/cattailGRAMINOID WETLANDS 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Herbaceous wetlands dominated by grass-like species. Major cover types are Baltic Rush (Juncus balticus), American Bulrush (Scirpus americana), Water Sedge (Carex aquatilis) and Cattail (Typha latifolia).
 EDIT BARREN LANDBARREN [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Bare soil or areas with vegetative cover generally less than 25%. Typically very light colored soils; dark soils may be classified as rock outcrop, or a Cover Type Group with vegetative cover as little as 10%.
 EDIT JUNIPER SAVANNAROCKY MOUNTAIN/GREAT BASIN OPEN CONIFER WOODLAND (Savanna) [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, low statured conifers that form moderately open to very open canopies (25% to 50% canopy cover). This type group can include very open canopied stands (10% to 25%) in the broad ecotone to grassland commonly referred to as savanna. Major cover types are Oneseed Juniper (Juniperus monosperma) and Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). Oneseed juniper is primarily a Rocky Mountain element, and Utah juniper is primarily a Great Basin element of the northwest part of the state. Undergrowth is predominantly grassy and dominated by warm season grasses such as blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), hairy grama (B. hirsuta), sideoats grama (B. curtipendula), purple threeawn (Aristida purpurea) and galleta (Hilaria jamesii). Shrub species such as wavyleaf oak (Quercus undulata), snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae), big sage (Artemisia tridentata), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) and winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) can be well represented in some communities (the latter three are associated with the Great Basin biogeographic province, and are particularly important in the northwest part of the state). Common forbs include Rocky Mountain zinnia (Zinnia grandiflora), James wild buckwheat (Eriogonum jamesii), and pingue actinea (Hymenoxys richarsonii). Mapped Distribution: extensively mapped in the foothills of most of the major mountain ranges of the state. They also occur on plateaus, mesas, and piedmont slopes (bajadas), and extend into the eastern plains of the state. Elevations: 1,500 m to 2,100 m (5,000-7,000 ft), with some communities extending down to 1,200 m (4,000 ft), and up to 2,400 m (8,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At higher elevations, common inclusions of, and broad ecotones with Rocky Mountain Closed Conifer Woodlands occur. The minor redberry juniper (Juniperus erythrocarpa) Cover Type, a Sierra Madrean element, may be an inclusion in the extreme southwest corner of the state. There also may be inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian, Rocky Mountain Montane Scrub and Interior Chaparral, particularly in areas that have been burned.
 EDIT BORDER PINYON/ALLIGATOR JUNIPERMADREAN CLOSED CONIFER WOODLAND 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, low statured conifers that form moderately closed to open canopies (50% to 80% canopy cover). The major cover types are Border Pinyon (Pinus discolor) and Alligator-bark Juniper (Juniperus deppeana). Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica) is a minor cover type that is rare in New Mexico. Evergreen oaks can occasionally occur in the canopy but they are not dominant. The undergrowth is variable and diverse. Some communities are characterized by shrubby evergreen oaks such as silverleaf oak (Quercus hypoleucoides), gray oak (Q. grisea), and Toumey oak (Q. toumeyi), or by other sclerophyllus shrubs such as wright silktassel (Garrya wrightii) and Wright mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus breviflorus). Other communities are grass and forb dominated by such species as bullgrass (Muhlenbergia emersleyi), pinyon ricegrass (Piptochaetium fimbriatum), Texas bluestem (Schizachyrium cirratum), false pennyroyal (Hedeoma hyssopifolia), and beans (Phaseolus spp.). Mapped Distribution: mapped only in foothills of the mountain ranges in the far southwest corner of the state. Elevations: 1,750 m to 2,300 m (5,800-7,500). Inclusions and ecotones: At upper elevations there may be inclusions of, and relatively narrow ecotones to Madrean and Rocky Mountain Lower Montane Conifer Forest, and Madrean Closed Oak Woodland. At lower elevations there can be a relatively broad ecotone to, and inclusions of Madrean Open Oak Woodland, along with the minor amounts of Madrean Open Conifer Woodland. There may also be inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian and Broadleaf Evergreen Chaparral, particularly in areas that have recently been burned.
 EDIT CHAPARRAL toumey/scrub/live oak/manzanBROADLEAF EVERGREEN INTERIOR CHAPARRAL: 2 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by evergreen hemi-sclerophyllous and sclerophyllous species. The major cover types are Scrub Live Oak (Quercus turbinella), Toumey Oak (Quercus toumeyi) and Point-leaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens). Common shrub associates include desert ceanothus (Ceanothus greggii), agave (Agave palmeri, A parryi), sacahuista (Nolina microcarpa), and algerita (Berberis haematocarpa). Undergrowth is usually poorly represented by scattered grasses and forbs. Mapped Distribution: scattered at lower elevations among the mountain ranges of central and southern New Mexico. Elevations: 1,675 m to 2,000 m (5,500-6,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: These are usually fire induced communities found in a matrix with Rocky Mountain or Madrean Conifer Woodland, or Madrean Open Oak Woodland. At higher elevations in the south there can be a transition to Rocky Mountain Deciduous Scrub. At lower elevations the transition can be to Chihuahuan Desert Grassland or Scrub. There may be inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT GREAT BASIN rabbitbrush/winterfat/etcGREAT BASIN BROADLEAF DECIDUOUS DESERT SCRUB [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by broadleaf deciduous shrubs that are cold and drought tolerant. The major cover types are Fourwing Saltbush (Atriplex canescens) and Rubber Rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), with lesser amounts of the Shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) and Winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) Cover Types. Big sage (Artemisia tridentata) may be present, but is not dominant. Herbaceous cover is variable, ranging from very sparse to grassy. Characteristic species are indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), western wheatgrass (Pascopyrun smithii), and mallow (Sphaeralcea parvifolia). Mapped Distribution: primarily in the northwestern plateau region of the state, but they do extend into the Rio Grande corridor, the Jornada and Tularosa basins and out into the lower Pecos River basin (primarily four-wing saltbush) and Plains (winterfat). These shrublands often occur in matrix with Great Basin Desert Microphyllous Desert Scrub, Grasslands and Open Conifer Woodlands. Elevations: 1,000 to 2,220 m (3,500-7,200 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland, Chihuahuan Desert Grassland and Chihuahuan Desert Scrub, and Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT MOHAVE DESERT SCRUB (AZ) 
 EDIT AGRICULTURALLandcover not dominated by native vegetation. Areas identified through geographic location (typically river valleys), and through pattern (geometric fields and center pivot irrigation) as being agricultural.
 EDIT BARRENAreas of little to no vegetative cover. When even minimal vegetative cover could be distinguished the feature is classified according to the vegetation Cover Type Group.
 EDIT BARREN: ROCK OUTCROPROCK OUTCROP. [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Features identified only if substantial bare surface is facing skyward. May include areas of bare soil.
 EDIT URBAN: NON-VEGETATEDURBAN [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage]. Areas of very limited vegetative cover. Includes cover normally classified as Barren including: densely developed downtown areas, large parking lots, and possibly, low density areas dominated by bare ground or plowed fields within the urban region .
 EDIT ENCINAL OAK open/gray/emory/white oakMADREAN OPEN OAK WOODLAND (Encinal) [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woodlands dominated by rounded crown, broadleaf evergreen oaks that form moderately open to very open canopies (25% to 50% canopy cover). The major cover types are Gray Oak (Quercus grisea), Arizona White Oak (Q. Arizonica) and Emory Oak (Quercus emoryi). Alligatorbark juniper (Juniperus deppeana) can be a common associate, but not a dominant. Undergrowth ranges from shrub to grass and forb dominated and can be high in diversity. Common shrub associates are Wrights silktassel (Garrya wrightii), manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens, A. pringlei), Arizona madrone (Arbutus arizonica), sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), and shrub liveoak (Q. turbinella). Characteristic grasses and forbs are bull muhly (Muhlenbergia emersleyi), beggartick threeawn (Aristida orcuttiana), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), pinyon rice grass (Piptochaetium fimbriatum), tick clover (Desmodium spp.), bean (Phaseolus spp.), grassleaf peavine (Lathyrus graminifolius), and New Mexico groundsel (Senecio neomexicanus). Mapped Distribution: These woodlands are mapped primarily in the foothills of the mountain ranges in the southwest corner of the state (Mogollon Mountains to the Peloncillos). They also extend up the Rio Grande corridor as far north as the southern Jemez Mts. Elevations: 1,300 m to 2,000 m (4,200-6,800 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At upper elevations there may be inclusions of, and relatively broad ecotones to Madrean Closed Conifer Woodland or Madrean Closed Oak Woodland. At lower elevation the common transition is either to Chihuahuan Foothill-Piedmont Desert Grassland, or Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland. There may be inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian while Interior Chaparral occur on sites that have recently been burned.
 EDIT SCRUBVegetation dominated by shrubs 0.5 to 5 meters (1.5 - 15 feet) tall, forming canopies with greater than 25% cover. MESOPHYTIC SHRUBLAND: Shrublands primarily of cool temperate climates dominated by moderately to very cold tolerant shrubs and moderately to very drought tolerant species. ROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE SCRUB & INTERIOR CHAPARRAL:[Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Shrublands of mid to lower elevations of mountainous and hilly regions primarily associated with the Rocky Mountain and Interior Southwest biogeographic provinces. Note, these two level III's were mapped together but occur as distinct Regional Biomes. The level IV's were also mapped and are numbered according to their association with either Montane Scrub or Interior Chaparral.
 EDIT Mt SCRUB mahogany/gambel/wavyleaf oakROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE DECIDUOUS SCRUB: [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by cold deciduous broadleaf species. The major cover types are Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus montanus), Gambel Oak (Quercus gambelii) and Wavyleaf Oak (Quercus undulata). Common shrub associates include snowberry (Symphoricarpos oreophilus), buckbrush (Ceanothus fendleri), rose (Rosa stellata, R. woodsii), scrub liveoak (Q. turbinella) and scrub grey oak (Q. grisea). Undergrowth is variable and can have a high diversity. Common herbs include fringed brome (Bromus ciliatus), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia), Louisiana sagewort (Artemisia ludoviciana), and green toadflax (Penstemon linarioides). Mapped Distribution: scattered at mid elevations among most of the mountain ranges of New Mexico, commonly on sites that have been burned. Elevations: 1,800 m to 2,750 m (6,000-9,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At higher elevations there are inclusions of, and ecotones to Rocky Mountain Closed Conifer Woodland and Rocky Mountain Lower Montane Forest. At lower elevations there can be a transition to Interior Chaparral and Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grasslands. There may be inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT SAND SCRUB shinnery oakPLAINS BROADLEAF SAND-SCRUB: [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by broadleaf hemi-sclerophyllous, moderately cold and drought tolerant species. The major cover type is Shinoak (Quercus havardii). Four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), sandsage (Artemisia filifolia) and white ratany (Krameria grayi) are common shrub associates, but they are not dominant. The undergrowth is typically grassy and characterized by scattered bunches of sand bluestem (Andropogon hallii), sand paspalum (Paspalum stramineum), plains bristlegrass (Setaria texanna). Common forbs include sand verbena (Abronia angustifolia), and Texas croton (Croton texensis). Mapped Distribution:Plains region of the east-central and southeastern portion of the state. Elevations: 1,200 m to 1,300 m (3,900-4,200 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Plains Microphyllous Sand-Scrub, and Plains-Mesa- Foothill grassland.
 EDIT SAND SCRUB sand sage/indigobushPLAINS MICROPHYLLOUS SAND-SCRUB: Composition: Shrublands dominated by microphyllous (small leaved) shrubs that are moderately cold and drought tolerant. The major cover types are Sandsage (Artemisia filifolia) and Indigobush (Psorothamnus scoparius). Rosemary Mint (Poliomintha incana) occurs as a minor cover type, primarily on gypsum dunes. Four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens) is a common shrub associate, but is not dominant. The herbaceous layer is characterized by scattered bunch grasses and forbs. Common species are giant dropseed (Sporobolus giganteus), spike dropseed (S. contractus), sandhill muhly (Muhlenbergia pungens), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), and common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Mapped Distribution: as inclusions within Plains Broadleaf Sand-Scrub, Great Basin Desert Scrub, Chihuahuan Desert Scrub and Chihuahuan Desert Grassland. They are primarily distributed along the Rio Grande corridor and in the Jornada and Tularosa basins. They are occasionally on the eastern plains and may include inclusions of Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT GREAT BASIN sagebrushGREAT BASIN MICROPHYLLOUS DESERT SCRUB: [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by microphyllous (small leaved) shrubs that are cold and drought tolerant. The major cover type is Big Sage (Artemisia tridentata), with lesser amounts of Black Sage (Artemisia nova) and Bigelow Sage (Artemisia begelovii) Cover Types. Other common shrub associates are four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), shadscale (A. confertifolia), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) and winterfat (Ceratoides lanata). Herbaceous cover is variable, ranging from very sparse to grassy. Characteristic species are Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii), and mallow (Sphaeralcea parvifolia). Mapped Distribution: primarily in the northwestern plateau region of the state, but they also extend into the Rio Grande corridor, and into the Jornada and Tularosa basins (primarily Bigelow sage). These shrublands often occur in a matrix with Great Basin Desert Broadleaf Desert Scrub, Grasslands and Open Conifer Woodlands. Elevations: 1,600 m to 2,220 m (5,250-7,200 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: may include Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland, Chihuahuan Desert Grassland and Chihuahuan Desert Scrub, and Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT LOW. CO. R. SONORAN DESERTSCRUB (AZ) 
 EDIT AGRICULTURAL: IRRIGATEDIRRIGATED AGRICULTURE. [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] May contain inclusions of native riparian vegetation in river valleys, or plowed fields classified as barren. Barren Areas of little to no vegetative cover. When even minimal vegetative cover could be distinguished the feature is classified according to the vegetation Cover Type Group.
 EDIT CHIH DESERT creosotebushCHIHUAHUAH BROADLEAF EVERGREEN DESERT SCRUB [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by very drought tolerant broadleaf evergreen shrubs. The major cover type is creosotebush (Larrea tridentata). Common sub-dominant shrub associates are mariola (Parthenium incanum), tarbush (Flourensia cernua), purple pricklypear (Opuntia violacea), cholla (Opuntia imbicata) and honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa). Herbaceous cover is variable and ranges from very sparse to grassy. Characteristic species are fluffgrass (Erioneuron pulchellum), black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda), field bahia (Bahia absinthifolia) and desert holly (Perezia nana). Mapped Distribution: extensive in the lowland areas of the southern portion of state from the lower Pecos River basin westward to the Arizona border. They extend northward up the Rio Grande corridor to the center of the state (Bernalillo County). They are often found in a complex matrix with Chihuahuan Desert Deciduous Scrub. Elevations: 900 m to 1,675 m (3,000-5,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: To the north- Great Basin Desert Scrub and Grassland. At higher elevations there are inclusions of, and ecotones to Chihuahuan Desert Grassland and Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland. May also include Southwest Arroyo Riparian. Occasionally there is an ecotone to Rocky Mountain Open Conifer Woodland.
 EDIT CHIH DESERT tarbush/mesquite/ocotilloCHIHUAHUAN BROADLEAF DECIDUOUS DESERT SCRUB [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Shrublands dominated by broadleaf deciduous shrubs that are cold intolerant and drought tolerant. The major cover types are Tarbush (Flourensia cernua), Honey Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), Whitethorn (Acacia constricta, A. neovernicosa) and Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens). Other common sub-dominant shrubs are fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae, G. microcephala), sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), little-leaf sumac (Rhus microphylla), cholla (Opuntia imbicata), and Christmas cactus (Opuntia leptocaulis). Herbaceous cover varies from very sparse to grass dominated. Common species are fluffgrass (Erioneuron pulchellum), mesa dropseed (Sporobolus flexuosus), alkali sacaton (S. airoides), lemonweed (Pectis papposa) and mallow (Sphaeralcea spp.). Mapped Distribution: extensive in the lowland areas of the southern portion of state from the lower Pecos River basin westward to the Arizona border. They extend northward up the Rio Grande and Pecos river corridors to the center of the state. They are often found in a complex matrix with Chihuahuan Desert Evergreen Scrub. Elevations: 900 m to 1,675 m (3,000-5,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: To the north- Great Basin Desert Scrub and Grassland. At higher elevations there are inclusions of, and ecotones to Chihuahuan Desert Grassland and Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland. May also include Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT MONTANE GRASSLAND sedges/muhly/fescueROCKY MOUNTAIN SUBALPINE AND MONTANE GRASSLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Mid to high elevation grasslands dominated by species associated with the Rocky Mountain biogeographic province. These grasslands are mapped in a limited, scattered distribution among the highest mountain tops of state. Elevations usually exceed 3,000 m (10,000 ft). This unit is a complex of the Rocky Mountain Montane Grassland and the Rocky Mountain Subalpine Grassland Cover Type Groups. Rocky Mountain Alpine Tundra can occur as an inclusion or an ecotone. ROCKY MOUNTAIN SUBALPINE GRASSLAND: Composition: High elevation grasslands dominated by dense stands of grasses, sedges and rushes; trees and shrubs are absent or rare. The major cover types are Mixed Sedge (Carex spp.) and Thurber Fescue (Festuca thurberi). Common herbaceous associates are danthonia (Danthonia californica, D. intermedia & D. spicata), beautiful sedge (Carex bella), sheep fescue (Festuca ovina), Rocky Mountain Nodding Onion (Allium cernuum), and bluebell (Campanula rotundifolia). Mapped Distribution: a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Subalpine and Montane Grassland Regional Biome. ROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE GRASSLAND: Composition: Mid to High elevation grasslands dominated by dense stands of grasses, sedges and rushes; trees and shrubs are absent or rare. The major cover types are Arizona Fescue (Festuca arizonica) and Mountain Muhly (Muhlenbergia montana). Common herbaceous associates are pine dropseed (Blepharoneuron tricholepis), fringed brome (Bromus ciliatus), flat sedge (C. foenea), tufted hairgrass (Deschampsia caespitosa), orange mountain dandelion (Agoseris aurantiaca), threenerve fleabane (Erigeron subtrinervis), and western blueflag (Iris missouriensis). Mapped Distribution: a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Subalpine and Montane Grassland Regional Biome.
 EDIT SHORT GRASS STEPPE gramma+buffalograssSHORT GRASS STEPPE [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands dominated by grasses generally less than 0.5 meters (1.5 ft) tall, and may be grazed quite short. Major cover types are Blue Grama (Bouteloua gracilis) and Hairy Grama (Bouteloua hirsuta). Common co- dominant grasses are purple threeawn (Aristida purpurea), western wheatgrass (Pascopyron smithii), buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides), and galleta (Hilaria jamesii). Common shrubs include winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), prairie prickly pear (Opuntia phaeocantha) and small soaptree yucca (Yucca glauca). Common forbs are milkvetch (Astragalus spp.), Wrights buckwheat (Eriogonum wrightii), curly gumweed (Grindelia squarosa) and prairie coneflower (Ratibida columnifera). Mapped Distribution: extensive mapped in the eastern plains region, and are well represented in the foothills of most mountain ranges and mesa tops in the state. These grasslands often occur in a complex matrix with Mid-grass and Tall-grass Prairie. Elevations: 1,200 m to 2,300 m (4,000-7,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: A broad ecotone can also occur at higher elevations with Rocky Mountain Open Conifer Woodland. At lower elevations and to the south, there is commonly a transition to Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands. To the northwest, transition may be to Great Basin Desert Grasslands. May also include Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT MID-GRASS PRAIRIE sideoats/wheatgrassMID-GRASS PRAIRIE [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands dominated by grasses generally greater than 0.5 meters (1.5 ft) and less than 1.0 meter (3 ft) tall, but may be grazed much shorter. The major cover types are Sideoats Grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), New Mexico Needlegrass (Stipa neomexicana), Western Wheatgrass (Pascopyrun smithii), Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Sand Dropseed (Sporobolus cryptandrus). Other common sub-dominant grass species include vine-mesquite grass (Panicum obtusum), plains lovegrass (Eragrostis intermedia) and plains bristlegrass (Setaria macrostachya). Important forbs include slender scurfpea (Psoralea tenuiflora) and white prairie clover (Petalostemon candidum). Mapped Distribution: extensively mapped in the eastern plains region of the state, and are scattered among the foothills and mesas elsewhere. These grasslands often occur in a complex matrix with Short-Grass and Tall-Grass Prairie. Elevations: 1,200 m to 2,400 m (4,000-8,000 ft). Inclusions: Plains-Mesa Sandscrub and Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT TALL GRASS PRAIRIE big/sand bluestemTALL GRASS PRAIRIE [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands dominated by grasses generally greater than 1.0 meter (3 ft) in height, but may be grazed much shorter. The major cover types are Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) and Sand Bluestem (Andropogon hallii). Yellow indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), silver sourgrass (Bothriochloa saccharoides), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and leadplant (Amorpha canescens) are common associates. Mapped Distribution: primarily in the far eastern plains region of the state, along the Texas border. These grasslands often occur in a complex matrix with Short-Grass and Mid-Grass Prairie. Elevations: 1,200 m to 1,500 m (4,000-5000 ft). Inclusions: Plains-Mesa Sandscrub
 EDIT GREAT BASIN GRASS galleta/ricegrassGREAT BASIN FOOTHILL-PIEDMONT GRASSLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands of mountain foothills, mesa tops and piedmont slopes (bajadas). Major cover types are Galleta (Hilaria jamesii) and Indian Ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides). Shrubs are common and include four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), Greene rabbitbrush (Chysothamnus greenii), and big sage (Artemisia tridentata). Mapped Distribution: primarily in the northwest plateau region of the state, but they do extend into the Rio Grande corridor. These grasslands often occur in a matrix with Great Basin Lowland/Swale Grasslands, Desert Scrub and Open Conifer Woodlands. Elevations: 1,400 m to 2,220 m (4,500-7,200 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland, Chihuahuan Desert Grassland, and Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT GREAT BASIN GRASS alkali sacatonGREAT BASIN LOWLAND/SWALE GRASSLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands of swales and basin bottoms. The major cover type is Alkali Sacaton (Sporobolus airoides). Overall diversity is low. Occasional associated species are big sage (Artemisia tridentata), four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), Torrey mormon tea (Ephedra torreyana), and giant sacaton (Sporobolus giganteus). Mapped Distribution: primarily in the northwestern plateau region of the state, but they do extend into the Rio Grande corridor. These grasslands often occur in a matrix with Great Basin Foothill-Piedmont Grasslands, Desert Scrub and Open Conifer Woodlands. Elevations: 1,150 m to 2,220 m (3,500-7,200 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grassland, Chihuahuan Desert Grassland and Desert Scrub.
 EDIT CHIH DESERT GRASSLAND black gramaCHIHUAHUAN FOOTHILL-PIEDMONT DESERT GRASSLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands of mountain foothills, mesa tops and piedmont slopes (bajadas). Major cover types are Black Grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) and Mesa Dropseed (Sporobolus flexuosus). Shrubs are common and are represented by soaptree yucca (Yucca elata), banana yucca (Yucca baccata), mormon tea (Ephedra trifurca, E. torreyana & E. nevadensis), sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), cholla (Opuntia imbicata), and mariola (Parthenium incanum). The herbaceous layer can be diverse and is represented by spiderling (Boerhavia spp.), blanket flower (Gaillardia pulchella), goldenweed (Haplopappus gracilis), globemallow (Sphaeralcea subhastata), mouse ear (Tidestromia lanuginosa) and zinnia (Zinnia acerosa). Mapped Distribution: extensive in the southern portion of the state. They also extend northward into the northwest plateau region, and into northeast plains region. Elevations: 1,200 m to 1,675 m (4,000 to 5,500 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At upper elevations inclusions of, and ecotones to Plains-Mesa-Foothill Grasslands, Rocky Mountain Open Conifer Woodland, and in the southwest corner of the state, Madrean Oak Woodland. At lower elevations the transition is most commonly to Chihuahuan Desert Scrub. May also include Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT CHIH DESERT GRASSLAND tabosa/sacatonCHIHUAHUAN LOWLAND/SWALE DESERT GRASSLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Grasslands of swales and basin bottoms The major cover types are Tobosa (Hilaria mutica), Giant Sacaton (Sporobolus wrightii), Saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) and Vine Mesquite Grass (Panicum obtusum). Shrubs are usually poorly represented except for four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens) or tarbush (Flourensia cernua). Overall diversity is relatively low. Common forbs include desert holly (Perezia nana), whitestem stickleaf (Mentzelia albicaulis) and salt globepea (Sphaerophysa salsula). Mapped Distribution: scattered in the southern portion of the state. They also extend northward into the northwest plateau region, and into the northeast plains region. Elevations: 900 m to 1,500 m (3,000 to 5,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: Great Basin Lowland/Swale Grassland, Plains-Mesa- Foothill Grasslands and Chihuahuan Desert Scrub. May also include Southwest Arroyo Riparian.
 EDIT RIPARIANPALUSTRINE SYSTEM: Vegetation directly associated with wetlands adjacent to rivers (riverine), riverbanks (palustrine) or lakes (lacustrine), e.g. marshes, bogs and riverbank areas. Commonly referred to as riparian/wetlands. PALUSTRINE FORESTED, SHRUB & EMERGENT WETLAND: Vegetation directly dependent on either ground water and/or flooding. FORESTED AND SHRUB WETLAND: Woody wetland vegetation dominated either by trees greater than 5 meters (15 ft) tall or by shrubs. Canopies range from open to closed canopies (25-100% canopy cover).
 EDIT MONTANE RIPARIAN cottonwd/alder/willowROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE FORESTED/SHRUB WETLAND 16 ha [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Woody wetland vegetation dominated by species associated with the Rocky Mountain biogeographic province. This map unit is a complex of the Rocky Mountain Montane Broadleaf Forested Wetland and Rocky Mountain Montane Shrub Wetland Series Groups described below. Mapped Distribution: along the larger rivers and streams in the mountainous regions of the state. Elevations: generally greater than 2,000 m (6,500 ft). Inclusions: Aspen (Populus tremuloides) and Blue spruce (Picea pungens) Cover Types can occur at higher elevations. ROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE BROADLEAF FORESTED WETLAND: Composition: Forests dominated by broadleaf, cold deciduous trees. Major cover types are Narrowleaf Cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), Boxelder (Acer negundo), Alder (Alnus oblongifolia, A. tenuifolia). Undergrowth is variable and diverse. Common species are redosier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), bearberry honeysuckle (Lonicera involucrata) and bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Montane Forested/Shrub Wetland described above. ROCKY MOUNTAIN MONTANE BROADLEAF SHRUB WETLANDS: Composition: Shrublands dominated by broadleaf, cold deciduous shrub species. Major cover types include Peachleaf Willow (Salix amygdaloides), Bebb Willow (Salix bebbiana) and Bluestem Willow (Salix irrorata). Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Rocky Mountain Montane Forested/Shrub Wetland described above.
 EDIT LOWLAND RIPARIAN cottonwood/sycamoreSOUTHWEST AND PLAINS FORESTED/SHRUB WETLAND [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Composition: Vegetation dominated by woody species primarily associated with the interior Southwest and Plains biogeographic provinces. This map unit is a complex of Southwest and Plains Broadleaf Forest and Southwest and Plains Shrub Wetland Cover Type Groups described below. Mapped Distribution: along the lower reaches of the larger rivers and streams of the state, including the Canadian, Pecos, Rio Grande, San Juan and Gila basins. Elevations: 900 m to 2,100 m (3,000-7,000 ft). Inclusions and ecotones: At higher elevations there is a gradual ecotone to Rocky Mountain Montane Forested/Shrub Wetland. SOUTHWEST AND PLAINS BROADLEAF FOREST: Composition: Forest dominated by broadleaf, cold deciduous trees. Major cover types are Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremonti), Plains Cottonwood (Populus sargentii), Arizona Walnut (Juglans major), Netleaf Hackberry (Celtis reticulata), and Arizona Sycamore (Platanus wrightii). Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Southwest & Plains Forested and Shrub Wetland above. SOUTHWEST AND PLAINS SHRUB WETLAND: Composition: Shrublands dominated by cold deciduous shrubs. Major cover types are Coyote Willow (Salix exigua) and Seepwillow (Baccharis glutinosa). Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) and Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) are major exotic cover types. Mapped Distribution: as a component of the broader Southwest and Plains Forested and Shrub Wetland above.
 EDIT ARROYO RIPARIAN Apache plume/mesquiteSOUTHWESTERN ARROYO RIPARIAN: Composition: Vegetation found along intermittent and ephemeral washes and dominated by species primarily associated with the interior Southwest biogeographic province. Distribution: It is mapped only as an inclusion in the surrounding upland vegetation. Elevations: 900 m to 2,100 m (3,000-7,000 ft). SOUTHWESTERN DECIDUOUS SHRUB ARROYO RIPARIAN: Composition: Shrublands dominated by deciduous shrubs. Major cover types are Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa), Brickelbush (Brickelia laciniata), Black Greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearifolia) and Screwbean Mesquite (Prosopis pubescens).
 EDIT URBANURBAN. Eighteen urban areas were identified by combining contiguous census blocks containing at least 7 persons/acre and forming at least a 12 square kilometer urban region. Within these boundaries, areas previously classified as Barren were reclassified to Urban and areas classified as vegetation Cover Type Groups were reclassified to Urban Vegetated except for agriculture and riparian classes which were not reclassified.
 EDIT AQUATIC: RIVERINE/LACUSTRINERIVERINE/LACUSTRINE. [Mapped by GAP in GIS coverage] Rivers, streams, and lakes. Streams and rivers less than 1 TM pixel (28.5m or ~90 ft.) in width will exhibit breaks or not be identified. Very small ponds consisting of a few pixels or less, or if they were dry, very shallow, or weedy at the time of the imagery may not be mapped.


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